Category Archives: Vocabulary

Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

Photo of quinoa for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

This recipe celebrates the earthy flavors of quinoa, one of my favorite ARTISANAL grains.

It’s not often that I find myself at a loss for what to cook, but when I do, I try to utilize what I have in my herb garden and pantry to create a STELLAR dish. Two days ago, I was having one of those moments  and needed some inspiration. With a little research, a look through the shelves in my kitchen, a glance at the herbs in my garden and some imagination, I came up with a fantastic  and tasty recipe for quinoa stuffed peppers that isn’t as OUTLANDISH and bizarre as it sounds!

Photo of quinoa stuffed peppers ingredients for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Ingredients: 4 cups cooked quinoa, 4 bell peppers (chop the tops off, remove the membranes and seeds,) 1 small red onion diced, 2 carrots peeled and diced, 3 stalks celery diced, 5 white mushrooms diced, 2/3 cup black beans, 1/4 cup chopped parsley, 1 cup tomato sauce, olive oil, salt and pepper, 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Photo of vegetables for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Dice the onion, mushrooms, celery stalks and carrots.

Photo of diced vegetables for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

A classic mirepoix plus mushrooms.

Photo of cooked vegetables for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Cook the vegetables in a large pot on medium heat with a drizzle of olive oil. Stir occasionally for about 15-20 minutes or until soft. Add the mushrooms and cook for another 5 minutes. Place the cooked vegetables into a large bowl.

Photo of quinoa for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Add in the quinoa.

Photo of parsley for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

And the parsley.

Photo of black beans for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Next add in the black beans.

Photo of tomato sauce for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

And the tomato sauce for moistness.

Photo of quinoa mixture for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Stir together all of the ingredients. The mixture is good on its own but is even better inside the peppers. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Photo of prepared peppers for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Place the peppers into a baking dish and lightly drizzle with olive oil. For this recipe I used orange peppers but green bell peppers are my favorite.

Photo of quinoa stuffed peppers for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Stuff the quinoa mixture into the peppers, wrap the top of the baking dish with aluminum foil and bake at 350ºF for about 40 minutes. Remove the foil and cook for another 15 minutes.

Photo of cheese for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Sprinkle the cheddar cheese on the peppers and broil for about 3 minutes until the cheese is melted.

Photo of quinoa stuffed pepper for blog post, "Quinoa Stuffed Peppers," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Remove from the oven and dig in! Who said healthy and delicious can’t be used in the same sentence?

Enjoy,

Charis

  • ARTISANAL = products made by workers in a skilled trade, especially making things by hand
  • STELLAR = exceptional
  • OUTLANDISH = unfamiliar, weird

 

NYC Restaurant Week 2012

Photo of nyc restaurant week 2012 for blogpost, " NYC Restaurant Week 2012," on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through S.A.T., Charis Freiman Mendel.

NYC restaurant week, summer 2012.

For foodies like me, restaurant week in New York City is the perfect opportunity to sample dishes from three-course menus at upscale restaurants, relatively inexpensively. During the event, lunch and dinner are offered at fixed prices, $24.07 and $35, respectively.

Butter Restaurant week 2012 appetizer menu for blog by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

We recently made the heirloom tomato salad at home, substituting raspberries for the strawberries

The name “restaurant week” is a MISNOMER because this period of reduced prices at select restaurants actually lasts for 20+ days. Restaurant week allows one to explore new restaurants and cuisines that otherwise would cost hundreds of dollars. The portion sizes are on the small size (to fit the price,) but I never left a restaurant feeling hungry.

As we have done every summer, my mom and I decided to SEIZE the opportunity to experience restaurants including Butter, Nobu, Petrossian, and Craftbar. We set up a five day plan of  “attack.”

Photo of amish chicken at craftbar for post on restaurant week 2012 by charis freiman-mendel, author of "cook your way through the s.a.t."

Craftbar offers Amish Chicken with pomme puree, sweet pea, thumbelina carrot and braised morel

I was glad to have tried New York’s “fine dining” at its best, but I found most of the food overrated. There was too much of an emphasis on fussy food and not enough on flavor. Dishes only need to be complicated when Chefs can’t allow their ingredients to speak for themselves. I really enjoyed the food at Craftbar, where everything down to the bread in the bread basket celebrated chef Tom Colicchio’s EXULTATION of the simple.

Happy eating,

Charis

  • MISNOMER = an inaccurate name
  • SEIZE = to take hold of
  • EXULTATION = celebration, joy

Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise (Paris)

Photo of Chez Marie Louise for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Chez Marie Louise is an oasis of fantastic and authentic Parisian food.

I’ve been back from France for three weeks and since I probably won’t be visiting again soon, I find myself REMINISCING by looking at the photos I took. Of all the cities I visited, my favorite was Paris, which happened to be our last stop.

I had been to Paris 2 years ago and was less than satisfied with the food and the people. I was on the receiving end of one too many of those INFAMOUS “French stares.” So, with bad memories and a very unimpressed stomach, I VOWED never to set foot on Parisian soil again. Never going back to Paris would be too soon for my taste.

Look at how well that went for me: Our flight from France back to America took off from Paris and I had to make the best of a short day in the City of Lights. After a whirlwind David Lebovitz tour of Paris, we had dinner at Chez Marie Louise, a Trip Advisor recommendation.

The restaurant was reasonably priced, and the food was exquisite. We ate outside and the ambiance was enhanced by the buck naked neighbor watching the diners from his terrace across the street. Delightful.

Cancel that previous vow I made. I can’t wait to get back to Paris.

Photo of chez marie louise menu for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The menu at Chez Marie Louise consists of traditional Parisian fare.

Photo of Chez marie louise for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

“Cuisine Traditionelle” is hard to come by in Paris. Seek and you shall find.

Photo of salmon tartare for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I’m a sucker for all fish tartares, and the one served at Chez Marie Louise is prepared simply with a squeeze of lime juice, toasted baguette and fresh lettuce.

Photo of avocado, shrimp, and grapefruit dish for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

This dish consists of a halved avocado, shrimp and grapefruit segments and is served with arugula and a creamy sauce, a surprisingly delicious combination.

Photo of eggplant dish for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

My mom ordered this tower of roasted eggplant which is served with a house-made sun-dried tomato sauce, ricotta cheese and a pesto sauce that has a slightly smoky flavor.

Photo of steak dish for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I also love steak, so it was a no brainer for me when I saw a steak dish on the menu. This steak sits in a thickened red wine sauce and is served with “pommes frites.” Oh La La.

Photo of fish dish for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

My dad picked this fish dish which proved to be the best thing on the menu hands down. It consisted of fish served in a creamy sauce with creamed spinach (I swear this was so incredibly tasty. It was anything but your grandma’s bland creamed spinach) and potatoes.

Photo of banana dessert for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The waiter convinced us to try the banana, caramel and ice cream dessert which was an out of this world, amazing, tasty, crispy, smooth, sweet and satisfying treat.

Photo of Chez Marie Louise owner for blog post, "Restaurant Review: Chez Marie Louise," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The charming and enthusiastic owner of Chez Marie Louise made the dining experience special and hilarious.

Revoir Bientôt, Paris,

Charis

  • REMINISCING = recalling the past
  • INFAMOUS = notorious
  • VOW = a solemn promise

Recipe: Sweet Cornbread

Photo of Cornbread for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Sweet cornbread is an ODE to Summer.

I have made it one of my new goals to create a COMPILATION of simple, traditional, no-fuss, homemade recipes to which I can always refer back. Sweet cornbread was the first side dish I AGONIZED over, (I’m a self-confessed perfectionist and some recipes just don’t come easily) and I’m proud to report back that I’ve come up with a successful outcome. I think you’ll love this one.

Photo of Sweet cornbread ingredients for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Ingredients: 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1 cup yellow cornmeal, 1/3 cup granulated sugar, 1/3 cup tightly packed light brown sugar, 1 1/2 tsps salt, 3 tsps baking powder, 1 egg, 1/2 cup milk, 1/2 cup half-and-half, 6 tbsps melted sweet cream butter.

Photo of preheated oven for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Pre-heat the oven to 400ºF.

Photo of flour for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Pour the flour into a large mixing bowl.

Photo of cornmeal for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Add the cornmeal.

Photo of white sugar for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Then the white sugar.

Photo of brown and white sugar for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

And the brown sugar for a smoky sweetness!

Photo of salt for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Next the salt goes in.

Photo of baking powder for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Baking powder for leavening.

Photo of dry ingredients for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

And mix, mix, mix the dry ingredients until they are all combined.

Photo of milk, egg and half-and-half for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Pour in the milk, egg and half-and-half. Don’t stir just yet.

Photo of butter for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Then pour in the melted butter. Almost done, I promise.

Photo of sweet cornbread mixture for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Mix everything until just combined. Then put down the whisk and walk away for 10 minutes to allow the mixture to thicken up a bit.

Photo of completed cornbread for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Place the mixture into a sprayed, 9″ round cake pan, bake for 20-25 minutes or until toothpick inserted comes out clean. Once done and cooled for 10 minutes, transfer the cornbread onto a serving dish.

Photo of sweet cornbread wedge for blog post, "Recipe: Sweet Cornbread," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Cut the warm bread into wedges and serve with a generous pad of warm butter. Yum.

Happy Summer,

Charis

  • ODE = a lyrical poem
  • COMPILATION = an assembled collection of things
  • AGONIZE =  undergo mental anguish

Product Review: Jovial Foods

Photo of Jovial Cookies for blog post, "Review: Jovial Food Products," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Jovial cookies are both healthy and tasty. Who’da thunk such a combination could exist?

If your idea of a good time involves a trip to Whole Foods, then you probably have heard of a recent fad in the health food world: Jovial. JOVIAL is a relatively new brand offering a nutrient-rich, healthy product line. It claims to go “beyond organic,” by using Einkorn, an ARCHAIC and pure variety of wheat. The Jovial brand also features gluten-free cookies and pastas.

The first Jovial product I tried was the Crispy Cocoa cookies. The folks at Jovial should consider changing the name to “Perfection In A Box,” because they are so good. These healthy treats, which are made of Organic Cocoa and Einkorn flour, are simple, incredible, not-too-sweet and completely addictive. Three of these cookies served with a glass of cold milk gives me my sugar and dessert fix for the day without providing unnecessary additives and artificial sweeteners.

Photo of Jovial pasta for blog post, "Review: Jovial Food Products," on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Jovial pasta.

I used to think that tasty whole grain pasta was an OXYMORON… not any more. Thanks to Einkorn, Jovial whole-wheat pasta does not suffer from the gritty texture and earthy taste of the traditional variety. Grit no more; each strand is as smooth and tasty as white pasta while still managing to hold any added sauces, oils or flavorings. I recommend serving it with high quality organic extra virgin olive oil, garlic, crushed red pepper flakes and salt. Delicious!

Ingredients:

Crispy Cocoa Cookies: Organic Einkorn Flour, Organic Cane Sugar, Organic Palm Fruit Oil, Organic Rice Syrup, Organic Cocoa, Leavening (Monocalcium Phosphate, Baking Soda), Salt.

Whole Grain Einkorn Pasta: Organic Whole Grain Einkorn, Water.

With Joviality,

Charis

  • JOVIAL = cheerful, happy
  • ARCHAIC =very old
  • OXYMORON = figure of speech combining contradictory terms

Fourth of July American Flag Cake

Photo of Fourth of July Cake for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Diego and Jorge, Tastetesters-In-Waiting, love Fourth of July Cakes.

Most people look forward to the Fourth of July for its fireworks and cookouts, but I look forward to the very traditional and very delicious, Fourth of July Cake that many Americans make. This AESTHETIC MASTERPIECE is ADORNED with strawberries, blueberries and cream cheese frosting and ends up looking like an American flag. Very patriotic!

Recipe adapted from Ruth Reichl’s “Nicky’s Vanilla Cake.”

Photo of ingredients for Fourth of July cake for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Ingredients: 2 sticks unsalted, room temperature butter, 1 cup white sugar, 3 eggs, 2 cups all-purpose white flour, 1 tsp baking soda, 2 tsp baking powder, 1 tsp salt, 1 cup sour cream, 2 tbsp vanilla extract.

Photo of butter and sugar for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Begin by preheating an oven to 350ºF and butter and flour a 9x13x2″ cake pan. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar using an electric mixer.

Photo of eggs and creamed mixture for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Add the eggs one at a time and mix together until smooth.

Photo of flour for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Add the flour in increments and mix.

Photo of sour cream and vanilla for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Add the vanilla and sour cream and mix until just combined.

Photo of cake batter for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Looking good!

Photo of prepared cake for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smooth over the top and bake for about 45-50 minutes or until golden brown and toothpick inserted comes out clean. Cool in pan, remove and cut the cake in 1/2 lengthwise.

Photo of cake decorations for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

For the frosting, I mixed together 8 oz room temperature cream cheese, 1/2 stick (4 tbsp) softened butter and 1/2 cup of powdered sugar. Frost the middle, top and outside of the cake until covered. Decorate with blueberries and strawberries to create the design of an American flag.

Photo of American flag cake for blog post, "Fourth of July Cake" on website, www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The finished product. This cake is open to creativity and the number of blueberries and strawberries doesn’t so much matter. Have fun with it!

Have a great Fourth,

Charis

  • AESTHETIC = pleasing to the eye
  • MASTERPIECE = a superior production
  • ADORN = decorate

David Lebovitz’s Paris

 Photo of The Eiffel Tower for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I’m finally home from my vacation in France, Amsterdam and Berlin, and as with any trip I’ve ever taken, I am experiencing some mixed emotions about being back. I try to lessen these FLUCTUATING feelings by living by  my mom’s MAXIM, “It’s great to travel and it’s great to come home.” I was able to finish off the trip with a short, but oh-so-sweet stop in the city of lights. I spent one week in Paris two years ago and wasn’t as impressed as I had anticipated. During that entire trip, I RELENTLESSLY tried to convince myself that I was as obsessed with the city as most Americans are. I am proud to say that thanks to my most current trip, I am a CONFIRMED Parisian-Lover, and the half-a-day I spent in Paris was, finally, as lovely as I had hoped.

I have one tip for ASPIRING travelers: Before you depart, read a book/s about the places that you are going to visit. During this trip, I read The Sweet Life in Paris, by food-blogger, David Lebovitz. At the back of this fantastic book, Lebovitz recommends restaurants, boulangeries, fromageries, e.t.c in Paris. Coming from someone who has lived there for over a decade, I trust his advice and made a point to stop at some of his holy grail Parisian places.

First Stop: Da Rosa

Photo of Da Rosa for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Restaurant Da Rosa offers traditional and authentic French fare.

Second Stop: Poilâne

Photo of Poilâne bread for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Bread offered at Poilâne bakery has gained the reputation of “best bread in the world” and is inscribed with a cursive “P.”

Photo of Poilâne apple tarts for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

David Lebovitz recommends these “deceptively simple” and incredibly delicious apple tarts from Poilâne.

Third Stop: Ladurée

Photo of Ladurée macarons for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The rose infused macaron I had from Ladurée  was the single best dessert I have tasted. They definitely live up to their reputation.

Photo of Ladurée pastries for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The pastries at Ladurée looked just as divine as the macarons.

Fourth Stop: G. Detou

Photo of G. Detou for blogpost, "David Lebovitz's Paris," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

G. Detou, which translates to “I have everything,” offers specialty foods ranging from chocolate to mustard. David Lebovitz says, “If G. Detou didn’t exist, I couldn’t live in Paris.” Please Note the E. Dehillerin bag in my Dad’s hand.

Charis

  • FLUCTUATING = rise and fall irregularly
  • MAXIM =  a saying
  • RELENTLESS = incessant
  • CONFIRMED = established
  • ASPIRE = hoping to achieve

Pictures from France: Part Trois

Photo of baguette for blogpost, "Pictures from France: Part Trois," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The greatest GLUTTON can top off a baguette all by himself.

Photo of hiking in Chamonix for blogpost, "Pictures from France: Part Trois," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

Our two hour PEREGRINATION through mountains surrounding Mont Blanc proved to be much easier than the twelve day tour we did two years ago.

Photo of prosciutto and melon for blogpost, "Pictures from France: Part Trois," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I IDOLIZE prosciutto and melon, my favorite appetizer. The one I sampled in Provence was possibly the best I’ve tasted yet. Slate plates are very typical in the region and add a rustic touch.

Photo of kayaking in the Dordogne River Valley for blogpost, "Pictures from France: Part Trois," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I am a kayaking ZEALOT and enjoy canoeing just as much.

Photo of fresh radishes for blogpost, "Pictures from France: Part Trois," on website www.SATgourmet.com, by author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T., Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The PIQUANT taste of fresh, spicy radishes can be complemented with a sprinkling of Fleur De Sel, a french salt.

Charis

  • GLUTTON = greedy eater
  • PEREGRINATION = journey, adventure
  • IDOLIZE = worship
  • ZEALOT = fanatic
  • PIQUANT = sharp, biting

Pictures From France: Part Deux

Photo of Mont Saint-Michel for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

CHIVALROUS knights once roamed the streets of Mont Saint-Michel.

Photo of Mont Saint-Michel for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The gusting wind outside of Mont Saint-Michel is anything but a ZEPHYR.

Photo of Nutella for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

I have a PREDILECTION for all things Italian, especially Nutella. In France, it’s easier than I thought to get your Italian fix.

Photo of dinner dish for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

The fish dish at “Auberge De Launay” in the Loire Valley was ADORNED with an edible flower. What a wonderful touch!

Photo of oil and vinegar decanter for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

You can’t help but MARVEL at this innovative and space-saving oil and vinegar decanter.

Photo of McDonald's happy meal for blogpost, "Pictures From France: Part Deux, on www.SATgourmet.com, by author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T," Charis Freiman-Mendel.

“La moche Americaine” AKA The ugly American AKA The REPUGNANT American.

Jordane, owner of Hotel Mas De La Croix D'Arles, St. Remy De Provence, France

At Hotel Mas De La Croix D’Arles, Etan, the PROPRIETOR’S hunting dog, is surprisingly lovable.

The adventure continues!

Charis

  • CHIVALROUS = brave, valiant
  • ZEPHYR = light breeze
  • PREDILECTION = preference
  • ADORN = decorate
  • MARVEL = to be astonished
  • REPUGNANT = repulsive, obnoxious
  • PROPRIETOR = owner

Pictures From France

Photo of Monet's garden for blog, "Pictures From France," on www.SATgourmet.com, a blog by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T.

First stop: Monet’s Garden. Me, Ross and my dad among the ANGELIC lily pads.

Photo of Gold Beach, Arromanches, France for blog "Pictures From France" by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

On June 6th, 2012 we visited Arromanches to COMMEMORATE the events that occurred on D-Day, ironically, June 6th, 1944. Me, my mom and brother in front of Gold Beach, one of the numerous beaches invaded by U.S. soldiers decades ago.

Photo of cod dinner at Au Bouillon Normand, Honfleur, France, for blog "Pictures From France" by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

Cod served with whipped potatoes, vegetables and an ETHEREAL sauce at Au Bouillon Normand in Honfleur. All of the ingredients were “du marche,” meaning, “of the market.”

Photo of McDonald's in France for blog, "Pictures From France" by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

McDonald’s, the ESSENCE of America, chez France.

Photo of Kitchen at Château de Chenonceau in the Loire Valley, for blog, "Pictures From France," on www.SATgourmet.com, by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

In the kitchen at Château de Chenonceau, baking bread was a QUOTIDIAN activity.

Photo of French riverside picnic, for blog, "Pictures From France," on www.SATgourmet.com, by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

HONING your inner French self made easy with riverside picnic.

Photo of stevia leaves growing in gardens at Château de Chenonceau, for blog, "Pictures From France," on www.SATgourmet.com, by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of cookbook, "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T."

I LOATHE the artificial sweet taste of stevia leaves.

Charis

  • ANGELIC = divine
  • COMMEMORATE = remember
  • ETHEREAL = heavenly
  • ESSENCE = spirit, nature
  • QUOTIDIAN = daily
  • HONE = sharpen
  • LOATHE = hate