Category Archives: Holidays

Possibly Pear Sauce

Photo of large pears, possibly Japanese La France pears, for blog post on Possibly Pear Sauce by Charis Freiman-Mendel, author of COok Your Way Through The S.A.T.

Japanese La France pears, hopefully

My family has been on a sugar high, eating our way through an ELABORATE Harry and David holiday gift basket we received a few weeks ago. We just discovered a box of fruit hidden underneath the cakes, cookies, crackers and jams.

Photo of genetically altered tomatoes for possibly pear sauce post by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

If they look too good to be true, think GMO

The fruit looks like a gigantic pear but not quite. It might be a fruit HYBRID. I’d rather not eat any GMO (genetically modified organism) so I did a google search and convinced myself it looked like the Japanese “La France” variety of pears. Three of us shared one and found it to be super sweet. Since it took so long to find it, the fruit was overripe and we decided to SALVAGE it by making Mystery Fruit Sauce AKA Possibly Pear Sauce.

Photo of ingredients for possibly pear sauce blog post by charis freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

Martinelli's mulling spices come in a tea bag for easy use

Photo of Possibly Pear Sauce ingredients including pears, orange juice, spices and mulled spices tea bag in a pot for post by Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T.

All wet and dry ingredients go into the pot, including the mulling spices tea bag

Adding a tea bag to pear sauce might seem COUNTERINTUITIVE, but it really adds great flavor and besides, what else will you do with mulling spices once the holidays are over?

Photo of Possibly Pear Sauce recipe for blog by Charis freiman-Mendel, author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T.

If you prefer a smoother texture, simmer longer or puree in a food processor

Photo of possibly pear sauce in serving bowl for blog post by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

Possibly pear sauce, chunky style

 

 

Possibly Pear Sauce makes a tasty dessert but can also be used as an ingredient in baked goods and as a topping for a wide variety of foods.

 

 

Happy New Year!

Charis and Jennie

  • OBSCURED = hidden
  • ELABORATE = complex
  • HYBRID = crossbreed
  • SALVAGE = save
  • COUNTERINTUITIVE = contrary to common sense

Hanukkah Apple Honey Cake

Happy Last Night of Hanukkah!

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of Hanukkah lights for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

In honor of the holiday, I made a festive apple honey cake loaf to usher in a sweet new year!

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of vanilla cake mix and loaf pan for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

Spray a loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray and choose your favorite vanilla cake mix (19 oz) before starting to bake

 

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of 2 green apples for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

Peel, core and thinly slice 2 firm granny smith apples

 

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of honey and cinnamon for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

Measure 1/4 cup honey and 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

 

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of cake batter for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

To complete the batter, mix together the apples, cinnamon, honey, and the other ingredients listed on the box of your store-bought cake mix. Mine called for 3 eggs, 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup vegetable oil

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of cake batter in loaf pan for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan and smooth over the top. Bake according to the instructions on the box of your cake mix. To ensure done-ness, insert a toothpick and if it comes out clean, it's done!

Charis Freiman-mendel, author of cook your way through the s.a.t., shows picture of completed cake for blog post on hanukkah apple honey cake recipe.

Serve by itself or with your favorite frosting

Enjoy the rest of your winter break!

Charis

Leftover Christmas Turkey Soup

Photo of tupperware leftovers in refrigerator for blog post on leftover christmas turkey soup by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

Tupperware wasteland or creative chef toolbox?

If you’re a foodie like me, it’s hard to stomach the idea of leftovers. Instead of looking at your fridge as a Tupperware wasteland, look at it as an opportunity to explore your creative potential. Christmas leftovers offer a BEVY of options for next day meals.

Drawing of turkey with suggestions for use as leftovers for blog post on leftover christmas turkey soup by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

I'm using the leftovers for soup and curried turkey salad

Don’t trash the turkey CARCASS… it’s a REPOSITORY of great flavor. Two simple ingredients, water and leftover bones and CARTILAGE, are a great place to start your “leftover Christmas turkey soup.”

Photo of leftover Christmas turkey soup for blog post on leftover christmas turkey soup by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

Hot soup and warm bread is a match made in heaven

“Leftover Christmas Turkey Soup” Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups chopped, leftover vegetables (carrots, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, green beans, sweet potatoes)
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 quarts turkey or vegetable broth
  • leftover turkey carcass and bones
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup minced parsley
  • Optional: 2 cups dry noodles, broken into small pieces

Prep:

  • Remove all turkey meat from the carcass and bones, shred
  • Sauté onion in olive oil in a large soup pot
  • Fill the pot with broth
  • Add turkey carcass and bones, simmer on low heat for 20 minutes
  • Remove carcass and bones from broth
  • Add turkey meat to pot
  • Add 3 cups leftover vegetables
  • Optional: add 2 cups noodles
  • Simmer until the pasta is cooked, about 12 minutes
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Garnish with parsley
Photo of artisanal breads for blog post on leftover christmas turkey soup by charis freiman-mendel author of cook your way through the s.a.t.

You may have to brave the cold to get some of this bread

Warm ARTISANAL bread is the perfect vehicle for sopping up the soup. Not in the mood for next day soup? Freeze it for a cold winter day when you’re too lazy to cook.

Bon Appetit!

Charis

  • BEVY = group
  • CARCASS = remains
  • REPOSITORY = storehouse
  • CARTILAGE = flexible connective tissue
  • ARTISANAL = artistic

 

Christmas Fruit Crumble

Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of frozen mixed berries for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

Place 24 oz of frozen mixed berries into a bowl

 

Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of sugar, flour, and lemon for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

Measure 1/4 cup flour, 1/4 cup sugar and 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice

 

Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of adding sugar to fruit for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

Add dry ingredients and lemon juice and stir

 

Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of ingredients for crumble topping for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

In a food processor, combine 1tsp cinnamon, 3/4 cup oats, 3/4 cup all-purpose flour, 2/3 cup packed brown sugar, and 7tbsp diced, cold butter

Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of Williams-Sonoma fluted tart pan for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

This Williams-Sonoma fluted tart pan was one of my Hanukkah gifts

 Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of Fruit crumbles ready to bake for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

Distribute the fruit mixture into 6 pans and evenly spoon crumble topping on each. Bake for 45 minutes at 425 Fahrenheit.

 Charis Freiman-Mendel author of Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T. photo of Bubbly crumbles ready to eat for blog post on christmas fruit crumble.

Spoon each fruit crumble into a bowl and serve with vanilla ice cream

Have a CONVIVIAL, MIRTHFUL, GLEEFUL, JOCUND, and very MERRY Christmas!

CONVIVIAL = cheerful
MIRTHFUL = high-spirited
GLEEFUL = happy
JOCUND = jolly
MERRY = convivial, mirthful, gleeful, jocund

Charis and Jennie

Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa And Festivus Food Coma

Photo of Roman feast for post on "food coma" on www.SATgourmet.com by Charis Freiman-Mendel

Roman feast

You survived Thanksgiving, but Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Festivus are coming up, so there may be a food coma in your future. In my house, the TORPOR that hits you after eating a big meal is known as a “post-prandial alkaline tide.” Growing up, I had to listen to that kind of dinner REPARTEE because both of my parents are doctors.

Image of mosaic of reclining Roman eating grapes for post on "food coma" and ChristmaHanuKwanzaakah and Festivus on S.A.T. gourmet Charis Freiman-Mendel

Exactly why you need a nap after eating a large meal, especially if it’s fatty, is not clear to scientists, but there are some things you can do to prevent or MITIGATE this effect:

  • chew your food thoroughly (chewing helps digestion)
  • eat small portions of food
  • choose less fats and carbs, more veggies
  • don’t rush through the meal
  • exercise before and after the meal

Consider breaking up the REPAST with a walk before the dessert course. PERAMBULATE to avoid becoming SOMNOLENT.

Charis

TORPOR = lethargy
REPARTEE = conversation
MITIGATE = lessen
REPAST = meal
PERAMBULATE = walk
SOMNOLENT = sleepy

Order “Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T.” for great cooking, great words, and fun facts.

Thanksgiving Traditions: Old And New

Thanksgiving is STEEPED in tradition. Every year, we tend to celebrate the holiday the same way we did the year before. It’s nice knowing what to expect, but sameness can also be MUNDANE.

Photo of Charis Freiman-Mendel, the S.A.T.gourmet and author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T." serving her ninety eight year old great aunt dinner at Thanksgiving for post on Tranksgiving traditions New and Old

My 98 year old great aunt Cesia has seen many traditions change

This year, my Mom and I decided to be ICONOCLASTs and break away from our traditional New England menu. We borrowed a recipe for cornbread from Sherian Davis Weiss, which she began enjoying as a little girl at her Grandma’s Thanksgiving feast in Texas.

Recipe for cornbread by Sherian Davis Weiss's grandmother for blog post by Charis Freiman-Mendel, the S.A.T. gourmet and author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T.", on Thanksgiving traditions old and new

I love how Sherian describes how her Grandma cooked

I decided to MODIFY the recipe as follows:

  • I minced 8 jarred jalapeno slices and stirred them into the batter before baking (everyone at our dinner likes spicy food)
  • Instead of making one loaf of cornbread, I divided the batter evenly into a 12 cup muffin tin and made individual cornbread cakes  (to make serving easier)
Photo of jalapeno corn bread muffins by Charis Freiman-Mendel, the S.A.T. gourmet and author of "Cook Your Way Through The S.A.T." for her post on Thanksgiving traditions old and new

Jalapeno cornbread cakes are ready when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out dry (about 15 minutes). Serve with warm, softened butter.

The jalapeno cornbread cakes are delicious and were a huge hit. They will be part of our ever changing Thanksgiving tradition.

Thanks, Sherian!

Charis

  • STEEPED: infused
  • MUNDANE: ordinary, routine
  • ICONOCLAST: one who destroys traditional or popular ideas
  • MODIFY: change

Recipe: Baked Pumpkin Seeds

                     Happy Halloween!

Photo of carved pumpkin for S.A.T. gourmet blog post on baked pumpkin seeds for Halloween

Photo of Charis and her Dad at Parent's Weekend for blog post on SATgourmet about baked pumpkin seedsMy Dad and I at Parent’s Weekend.

Once a year we have Parent’s Weekend at my school. My Mom and Dad came for two days and sat in on all of my classes. Yesterday we arrived home for a long weekend. Since I’m not due back at school until Tuesday, I have time to cook, try new recipes, and revisit old favorites. Halloween, one of the most fun holidays, is coming up, so we bought a pumpkin at our local health food store. I don’t really like the taste of pumpkin, but I love the seeds.

Here’s a simple recipe for baked pumpkin seeds:

Photo of Charis removing pumpkin seeds for an S.A.T.gourmet blog post on baked pumpkin seeds.      Using a paring knife, cut off the stem of the pumpkin.

Photo of pumpkin seeds soaking in water for S.A.T.gourmet post on baked pumpkin seeds.      Scoop out the seeds & separate them from the meat                                                   of the pumpkin. Place the seeds in cold water & let                                                     them soak while you scoop out all of the seeds.

Photo of strained pumpkin seeds for post on baked pumpkin seeds on S.A.T.gourmet.      Strain the seeds using a colander.

Photo of Charis blotting the water off of pumpkin seeds for a blog post on baked pumpkin seeds on S.A.T.gourmet.      Transfer the seeds to a sheet pan & blot off the                                                   excess water using a paper towel.

Photo of olive oil for blog post on baked pumpkin seeds for S.A.T.gourmet.      Lightly drizzle olive oil on the seeds.

Photo of black pepper for blog post on baked pumpkin seeds for S.A.T.gourmet.      Crack black pepper on the seeds, to taste.

Photo of spices for blog post on baked pumpkin seeds on S.A.T.gourmet.      Sprinkle spices on the seeds. I decided to use salt for                                                    one half & garlic powder + cayenne pepper for the                                                     other half.

Photo of baked pumpkin seeds for blog post on S.A.T.gourmet.      Bake the seeds at 400ºF for about 15 – 20                                                     minutes, tossing occasionally. Let cool and serve.

Pumpkins CHARACTERIZE Halloween, but it wasn’t always that way. Prior to the 19th century, turnips were carved into jack-o’-lanterns in Ireland and Scotland. Americans prefer pumpkins over turnips for their festive color and because they are CAPACIOUS, which makes them much easier to carve.

CHARACTERIZE (verb): to describe distinctively

CAPACIOUS (adjective): large

Charis

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